Week 23: Dribbling with a Hockey or Foam Stick (B)

GRADE

TOPIC

UNIT

Kindergarten

Dribbling with a Hockey or Foam Stick

Games

Equipment Needed

Cones, Spots, Yarn Balls, Music, Sticks

Content Standard Benchmarks or Common Core Standards
Learning Goals, Objectives, Expected Outcomes

Psychomotor

  1. Dribble a hockey puck around the space with control.

Cognitive

  1. Verbally describe the steps to dribbling.

Affective

  1. Have Fun
  2. Travel safely while playing the game and moving with an implement.

ACTIVITY

PROCEDURE AND TRANSITIONS WITH MODIFICATIONS AND OR ACCOMMODATIONS

SETUP DESCRIPTION OR DIAGRAM

Entrance Routine This entrance routine is specific to your school community.
Part 1

Warm-up/Review

10 Minutes

Safety

Review Travel Stop with the Hockey Stick.

Transition
Leave your stick in your own space and get a yarn ball. When you get back to your own space, put the yarn ball on the ground and use your stick to move it around on the floor, keeping it close to you as you move.  Keep the yarn ball on the floor, only moving it with your stick.  Remember to use two hands on the stick and keep it in a low level.  When I call freeze, put your stick on the ground next to your ball.
Part 2

New skill or concept

10 Minutes

Explain to the children that this is dribbling with a hockey or stick.  When you dribble with a stick, you still keep the ball close and move it with short hits.   

Be sure not to have the students answer the questions before you give them an opportunity to physically work on the question. As they are working you can walk around the students, listening to what they have discovered the answer to be.

Q1. In order to see where you are going and also see the other people playing, what should you look at as you are traveling around moving the puck with your hockey stick? (The puck and where you are going.) *Stop the class and ask the question the second time, looking for students to answer with what they found as they were working. Choosing students that you know already understand the answer will enable you to discuss the reason for the choice, allowing students who might not have figured it out yet something to figure into their decision.

Q2. If you want the puck to stay close to you, how should you hit it? With a hard or soft motion? (Soft) With big strong hits or short taps? (Short Taps) *Stop the class and ask the question the second time, looking for students to answer with what they found as they were working. Choosing students that you know already understand the answer will enable you to discuss the reason for the choice, allowing students who might not have figured it out yet something to figure into their decision.

Q3. If you want control of both the bottom and the top of the stick, how should your hands be holding the stick? (One hand on the top, and the other about halfway down the stick.) * Stop the class and ask the question the second time, looking for students to answer with what they found as they were working. Choosing students that you know already understand the answer will enable you to discuss the reason for the choice, allowing students who might not have figured it out yet something to figure into their decision.

Q4. For the best control, which hand should be holding the top of the stick and which one is holding the middle part of the stick? (Strong hand in the middle and Weak hand on the top) * Stop the class and ask the question the second time, looking for students to answer with what they found as they were working. Choosing students that you know already understand the answer will enable you to discuss the reason for the choice, allowing students who might not have figured it out yet something to figure into their decision.

Q5. Which hand gives the force to the ball? (The strong hand, the one holding closer to the blade.) * Stop the class and ask the question the second time, looking for students to answer with what they found as they were working. Choosing students that you know already understand the answer will enable you to discuss the reason for the choice, allowing students who might not have figured it out yet something to figure into their decision.

Once your students are able to travel safely while moving the ball you can move onto part three.

Transition
Stay in your own space.
Part 3

Practice

10 minutes

Dribble/Stop with Music

Use a travel stop song to play as the students dribble.  When the music plays; Dribble, when the music stops; freeze and put the stick on the ground next to your ball in your own space.

Word dribble

Begin with the word “Dribble” written on letter cards on the cones. If possible, have a few of these dribble courses throughout the boundaries. The students will dribble around inside the boundaries and as they come to a Word Dribble zone, they will dribble, weaving in and out of the cones, spelling the word as they go through.   As they dribble the students will call out the letters when they pass by them.  You can also mark the ground with chalk, or use poly spots (one letter on each spot) placed so that the children can dribble the yarn ball; weaving around in and out through the words.

To change up the drill, but still practice spelling, create word dribbles with the class vocabulary or spelling words!

Transition
Put your stick and ball away and get a mat for stretches.  Put your mat in an own space inside our boundaries.
Part 4

Stretching & closure

Taking it Home

Cool Down

Choose 3 stretches to do with the class.

Review

Where level is the ball in when you are dribbling it?

What are some points that are the same about dribbling no matter what you are using?

Keep it close to you as you move around inside the boundaries.

Soft hits

Look where you are going and the ball

Closure

Teach someone in your house how to dribble with a stick. You can use the stick and sock ball you made last week.